Tag Archive for Additive manufacturing

Renishaw and Aeromet work to optimise high-performance alloy

Renishaw and Aeromet International Limited announced a collaboration to establish additive manufacturing process parameters and material properties for Aeromet’s A20X® aluminium alloy. Following a successful debut at the Paris Air Show, last month, the two companies are working together to optimise the processing techniques for the high-performance alloy on Renishaw metal additive manufacturing (AM) systems. They are also investigating a range of heat treatment regimes to deliver optimum properties in additively manufactured components. The results of these developments will be made available to Renishaw and Aeromet customers.

The Digitally Connected Factory

The digitally connected factory is rapidly becoming a reality, thanks to huge leaps in affordable data handling capabilities. As more machines begin to communicate with each other, production efficiency goes up. Add the ability of analytic tools to predict maintenance needs, and productivity improves even more.

The days of the traditional machine tool are not numbered

The whole world is talking about 3D printing, additive manufacturing and generative multi-layer construction technologies. Nevertheless, this is a long way from meaning that the classical machine tool is going to be pensioned off. The EMO Hannover 2017 will be showcasing an international banquet of production technology – with alternative processes as the highly auspicious icing on the cake.

3D Printing Helps Create Work Ready MEMS Engineers

Microelectromechanical systems, also known as MEMS, could be described as tiny machines that have both mechanical and electrical components. The focus of this definition is most certainly the tiny part. While the dimensions of a MEMS can vary, their size can be anywhere from several millimeters to less than one micrometer, they are typically smaller than the width of a human hair.

Desktop Metal and its Mission to Make Metal 3D Printing Accessible

Additive manufacturing, probably better known by the masses as 3D printing, is a technology that’s been around for a long time but more recently has generated a lot of buzz, and not just among the technophiles and early adopters. Students, home hobbyists, makers, and yes, certainly product designers and engineers are seeing manufacturing from a fresh, new perspective. Imagine a technology that enables you to quite literally make anything, any shape of any complexity. No more minimum production runs. You need just one? It’s now doable.

Exchanging metal 3D printing solutions with HiETA

Technology from Renishaw is helping HiETA to move metal additive manufacturing (AM) from prototype manufacture into commercial production of its specialist range of heat exchangers. In particular, the recent addition of Renishaw’s RenAM 500M system at the company has enabled manufacturing times and, therefore production costs, to be reduced dramatically.

The Power of Generative Design is coming to Autodesk Netfabb 2018

“Among comic book superheroes, Tony Stark is my favorite. Why? Because he doesn’t have powers from a freak accident or through an extraterrestrial birth. No, he’s an engineer who uses his brain – and technology – to solve problems.” That’s what the capabilities in Netfabb 2018, the comprehensive additive manufacturing solution, will do for customers: give them the power to combine human ingenuity and machine learning, where the two together are greater than the sum of their parts.

Renishaw collaborates in the Futuralve project for the new generation of high-speed turbines for aerospace

Renishaw, a global engineering company specialising in metrology and metal 3D printing, was born out of the aerospace business and its efforts in advancing the manufacturing of complex components have never stopped. Its Spanish subsidiary Renishaw Ibérica, S.A.U. is working with a unique selection of other Spanish engineering companies and research centres in a ground-breaking project which could change the way aerospace turbines are manufactured forever.